Learn How Mercedes-Benz 4MATIC® All-Wheel Drive Works

October 3rd, 2016 by

In today’s world of all-wheel drive luxury vehicles, there’s one moniker synonymous with durability, stability and versatility: Mercedes 4MATIC®. Introduced in 1987 on the W124-series E Class sedans and wagons, 4MATIC® has been tackling Utah’s Rocky Mountain roads for nearly three decades. Available today throughout nearly all of Mercedes-Benz’s sedan, coupe, convertible, SUV and AMG® model lines, 4MATIC® all-wheel drive is your ultimate companion for driving in any season.

4matic

In its first generation, 4MATIC® was a complex system with electronically-controlled four-wheel drive. Employing the rear wheels in normal driving, it’d lock both the center and rear differentials to provide enhanced traction when slippage was detected. Incredibly advanced for its time, original 4MATIC® could vary power from 100% rear to a 35/65-percent front/rear split or 50/50-percent front/rear split, depending on traction needs. The rear differential could also be locked, enabling both rear wheels to spin at exactly the same speed; for example, when the vehicle might have been stuck with one rear wheel in the snow.

4matic

The second generation of 4MATIC® was introduced in 1998/1999 on the W210-series E Class sedan. Nearly seamless and automatic in operation, this generation employed a full-time all-wheel drive system with three open differentials – front, center and rear. The Electronic Traction System (ETS) assisted with limiting wheel slip in all conditions, and could help limit and vary power from front to rear, when needed. Though robust, this generation was intrinsically simple to operate and reliable and inexpensive to maintain.

4matic

Today, Mercedes-Benz 4MATIC® all-wheel drive inspires all-season competence and all-road confidence. From a menacing Utah storm to a challenging corner, 4MATIC® all-wheel drive makes the most of available traction. A transfer case, integrated within the 7-speed automatic transmission, feeds power to the front axles. A limited-slip center differential provides balanced power between the front and rear axles.And the 4-wheel Electronic Traction System (4-ETS) uses sensors already in the vehicle for its Antilock Braking System (ABS) and Electronic Stability Program (ESP®),to precisely manage the torque demands of each wheel.

4matic

Having invented the car, the truck and the motorcycle before the turn of the 20th century, it’s probably no surprise that Gottlieb Daimler’s son Paul, a mechanical engineer himself, first sketched the design for an all-wheel drive (AWD) system in 1903. From this first idea, to such off-road legends as the G-Class and Unimog, to the first 4MATIC® sedans nearly 30 years ago, the story of AWD and Mercedes-Benz is indeed a gripping one.

Experience Utah’s newest Mercedes-Benz 4MATIC® inventory at Mercedes-Benz of Farmington today. Ordering is now open for all vehicles, with most targeted delivery dates between October and November. Click here to learn more.